Our latest JAMA paper: teaching hospitals and thinking about conflict of interest

How much does it matter which hospital you go to? Of course, it matters a lot – hospitals vary enormously on quality of care, and choosing the right hospital can mean the difference between life and death. The problem is that it’s hard for most people to know how to choose. Useful data on patient outcomes remain hard to find, and even though Medicare provides data on patient mortality for…

Correlation, Causation, and Gender Differences in Patient Outcomes

Our recent paper on differences in outcomes for Medicare patients cared for by male and female physicians has created a stir.  While the paper has gotten broad coverage and mostly positive responses, there have also been quite a few critiques. There is no doubt that the study raises questions that need to be aired and discussed openly and honestly.  Its limitations, which are highlighted in the paper itself, are important. …

Do women make better doctors than men?

About a year ago, Yusuke Tsugawa – then a doctoral student in the Harvard health policy PhD program – and I were discussing the evidence around the quality of care delivered by female and male doctors. The data suggested that women practice medicine a little differently than men do. It appeared that practice patterns of female physicians were a little more evidence-based, sticking more closely to clinical guidelines.  There was…

ACO Winners and Losers: a quick take

Last week, CMS sent out press releases touting over $1 billion in savings from Accountable Care Organizations.  Here’s the tweet from Andy Slavitt, the acting Administrator of CMS: NEW ACO RESULTS: physicians are changing care, w better results for patients & are saving money. Over $1B. https://t.co/FEfe3QErb5 — Andy Slavitt (@ASlavitt) August 25, 2016 The link in the tweet is to a press release.  The link in the press release…

Making Transparency Work: why we need new efforts to make data usable

Get a group of health policy experts together and you’ll find one area of near universal agreement: we need more transparency in healthcare. The notion behind transparency is straightforward; greater availability of data on provider performance helps consumers make better choices and motivates providers to improve. And there is some evidence to suggest it works.  In New York State, after cardiac surgery reporting went into effect, some of the worst…